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dc.contributor.authorBurns, Kelly Duganen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:35:21Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:35:21Z
dc.date.issued2009-04-23en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05062009-175428en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32274
dc.description.abstractThe impact of the September 11th, 2001 World Trade Center attacks was expansive in nature, and so many people were deeply affected by this disaster. In the years following this attack, many researchers attempted to assess this level of impact. Data point to increased prevalence rates of posttraumatic stress and depressive symptomatology among adults and a variety of difficulties among children following trauma. Additionally, research has shown that geographic proximity to a traumatic event plays a role in identifying those with increased psychological distress. Oneâ s subjective experience of a traumatic event, and in particular, oneâ s perception of threat to life, also appears to be important in the identification of those in need. Moreover, understanding the psychological effects of individuals who have experienced a traumatic event is essential to the effective screening and identification of those in need of mental health services. As such, the purpose of this study was to examine the ability of geographic exposure and the perceived life threat to predict psychological outcomes in parents and their young children following the World Trade Center attacks in New York City. Additionally, the moderational roles of race/ethnicity and socio-economic status were also examined. Neither maternal geographic exposure nor perception of life threat significantly predicted mental health outcomes in mothers or their young children. However, socio-economic status significantly moderated the relationship between maternal geographic exposure and childrenâ s externalizing behaviors. Finally, the effect of race/ethnicity approached significance for maternal PTSD symptoms; however, no significant moderation was found.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartThesis.Defense.Kelly.Burns.June.9.2009.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectdepressionen_US
dc.subjectPTSDen_US
dc.subjectexposureen_US
dc.subjecttraumaen_US
dc.subjectperceived life threaten_US
dc.subjectyoung childrenen_US
dc.titleThe Effects of Perceived Life Threat and Direct Exposure on Psychopathology in Parents and Their Young Children Following the September 11th, 2001 World Trade Center Attacksen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairJones, Russell T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOllendick, Thomas M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKim, Kee Jeongen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05062009-175428/en_US
dc.date.sdate2009-05-06en_US
dc.date.rdate2012-04-30
dc.date.adate2009-06-17en_US


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