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dc.contributor.authorBelcastro, Elizabeth Lynnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-21en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:35:34Z
dc.date.available2012-05-21en_US
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:35:34Z
dc.date.issued2012-04-23en_US
dc.date.submitted2012-05-07en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05072012-130457en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32342
dc.description.abstractThe life cycle analysis compares the environmental impacts of catalytic converters and the effects of not using these devices. To environmentally evaluate the catalytic converter, the emissions during extraction, processing, use of the product are considered. All relevant materials and energy supplies are evaluated for the catalytic converter. The goal of this life cycle is to compare the pollutants of a car with and without a catalytic converter. Pollutants examined are carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrocarbons (HC), and nitrogen oxides (NOx). The main finding is that even considering materials and processing, a catalytic converter decreases the CO, HC and NOx pollutant emissions. The CO2 emissions are increased with a catalytic converter, but this increase is small relative to the overall CO2 emissions. The majority of catalytic converter pollutants are caused by the use phase, not extraction or processing. The life cycle analysis indicates that a catalytic converter decreases damage to human health by almost half, and the ecosystem quality damage is decreased by more than half. There is no damage to resources without a converter, as there are no materials or energy required; the damages with a converter are so small that they are not a significant factor. Overall, catalytic converters can be seen as worthwhile environmental products when considering short term effects like human health effects of smog, which are their design intent. If broader environmental perspectives that include climate change are considered, then the benefits depend on the weighting of these different environmental impacts.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartBelcastro_EL_T_2012.pdfen_US
dc.relation.haspartBelcastro_EL_T_2012_fairuse_1.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectcordierite ceramicen_US
dc.subjectpassenger caren_US
dc.subjectair emissionen_US
dc.subjectcatalytic converteren_US
dc.subjectlife cycle analysisen_US
dc.titleLife Cycle Analysis of a Ceramic Three-Way Catalytic Converteren_US
dc.typethesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMaterials Science and Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairClark, David E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPickrell, Gary R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcGinnis, Sean P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHolbrook, Micheleen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05072012-130457/en_US


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