Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCrawford, Christopher Johnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:35:40Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:35:40Z
dc.date.issued2007-04-06en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05082007-173344en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32381
dc.description.abstractIn the southern Appalachians, unforested openings known as balds persist on or near mountain peaks. These high elevation openings support a variety of unusual biota and are considered globally rare as a result of their biodiversity. Balds have historically been subject to both natural and human disturbances. Such historical and more recent disturbances have had a profound impact on vegetation dynamics in these systems. With the use of dendrochronology and GIS, this research project was aimed at 1) reconstructing the temporal and spatial patterns of tree encroachment into Craggy Gardens, a grass/heath bald, and determining the causal factors, and 2) investigating tree-growth responses of Quercus rubra L. to climatic factors at Craggy Gardens and Big Bald, North Carolina (high elevation forest-grass ecotones). Results indicate that historical grazing and land management have been responsible for vegetation changes at Craggy Gardens, in particular the advancement of Quercus rubra L. into the grass bald. Dendrochronological analyses showed that incremental growth of Quercus rubra L. growing in and adjacent to the balds was controlled by spring temperatures and drought conditions over most of the past century, until around 1970, when tree began responding primarily to growing year summer temperatures over the last four decades. This study concluded that land-uses overprinted on climatic conditions have governed local-scale vegetation structure over the past 150 years and without continuing management, trees may continue to advance into Craggy Gardens. Changing human disturbances along with observed climate changes in recent decades provides will most assuredly set the stage for future vegetation changes in southern Appalachians balds.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartTitle,Abstract.pdfen_US
dc.relation.haspartChapters.pdfen_US
dc.relation.haspartTableofContents.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectSouthern Appalachian Baldsen_US
dc.subjectQuercus rubra L.en_US
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen_US
dc.subjectGISen_US
dc.titleA Dendrochronological Analysis of Vegetation Change and Climate History in Two Southern Appalachian Balds, Craggy Gardens and Big Bald, NCen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGeographyen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairKennedy, Lisa M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCampbell, James B. Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCopenheaver, Carolyn A.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05082007-173344/en_US
dc.date.sdate2007-05-08en_US
dc.date.rdate2010-10-27
dc.date.adate2007-05-10en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record