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dc.contributor.authorSantamaria, Suzanne Lamaren_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:35:44Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:35:44Z
dc.date.issued2012-04-25en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05082012-121749en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32400
dc.description.abstractAnimal classification needs vary by use and application. The Linnaean taxonomy is an important animal classification scheme but does not portray key animal identifying information like sex, age group, physiologic stage, living environment and role in production systems such as farms. Ontologies are created and used for defining, organizing and classifying information in a domain to enable learning and sharing of information. This work develops an ontology of animal classes that form the basis for communication of animal identifying information among animal managers, medical professionals caring for animals and biomedical researchers involved in disciplines as diverse as wildlife ecology and dairy science. The Animals in Context Ontology (ACO) was created from an extension and subset of the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine â Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT). The principles of the Open Biological and Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) Foundry were followed and freely available tools were used. ACO includes normal development and physiologic animal classes as well animal classes where humans have assigned the animalâ s role. ACO is interoperable with and includes classes from other OBO Foundry ontologies such as the Gene Ontology (GO). Meeting many of the OBO Foundry principles was straightforward but difficulties were encountered with missing and problematic content in some of the OBO ontologies. Additions and corrections were submitted to four ontologies. Some information in ACO could not be represented formally because of inconsistency in husbandry practices. ACO classes are of interest to science, medicine and agriculture, and can connect information between animal and human systems to enable knowledge discovery.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartSantamaria_SL_T_2012.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectveterinary informaticsen_US
dc.subjectanimals in contexten_US
dc.subjectbiomedical ontologiesen_US
dc.subjectOBOen_US
dc.subjectSNOMED-CTen_US
dc.titleDevelopment of an ontology of animals in context within the OBO Foundry framework from a SNOMED-CT extension and subseten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentVeterinary Medical Sciencesen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineVeterinary Medical Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairWilcke, Jeffrey R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRees, Loren Paulen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGreen, Julie M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZimmerman, Kurt L.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05082012-121749/en_US
dc.date.sdate2012-05-08en_US
dc.date.rdate2012-06-05
dc.date.adate2012-06-05en_US


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