Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHorner, Jean M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:36:03Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:36:03Z
dc.date.issued2006-03-21en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05102006-165311en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32509
dc.description.abstractThe Pedestrian is compromised in the majority of our built landscapes. Today's dominant fixture is the automobile. Pedestrian and automobile efficiency are in direct competition with each other; to facilitate one is to inhibit the other. Pedestrian functionality depends on the presence of walkable destinations, commonly referred to as multi-use areas. Pedestrian functionality is an important issue because sprawl, the current development norm, is reaching the physical limits of the countryside. Density is the positive alternative to issues we encounter as a result of low density such as increased runoff, pollution, congestion, obesity, physical inactivity, and road rage. â The alternative to sprawl is simple and timely: neighborhoods of housing, parks and schools placed within walking distance of shops, civic services, jobs and transit â a modern version of the traditional town.â 1 Improving pedestrian functionality has the ability to impact multiple aspects of our lives and improve the quality of life we experience. â We need communities that are occupied full time and that provide a world of opportunity for kids, communities that support women and men in their efforts to weave together an ever more complex life of home and work.â 2 1 Calthorpe, Peter, p. 16 2 Duany, Andres, p. 25en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspart2006_JeanHorner_thesis-REVISED_061406.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectdensityen_US
dc.subjectmulti-useen_US
dc.subjectpedestrianen_US
dc.subjectActive livingen_US
dc.titleDelightful Density: The Answer to Suburbia's Missing Pedestrianen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentLandscape Architectureen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Landscape Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Landscape Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLandscape Architectureen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairMiller, Patrick A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKaten, Brian F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPiedmont-Palladino, Susan C.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05102006-165311/en_US
dc.date.sdate2006-05-10en_US
dc.date.rdate2006-06-19
dc.date.adate2006-06-19en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record