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dc.contributor.authorClaus, Susan Lynneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-16en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:36:05Z
dc.date.available2009-06-16en_US
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:36:05Z
dc.date.issued2009-04-29en_US
dc.date.submitted2009-05-10en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05102009-185707en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32520
dc.description.abstractThis study examined meditative practices among group participants and therapists, participating in the Domestic Violence Focused Couples Treatment (DVFCT) group using the phenomenology and systems frameworks. Specifically, this inquiry explored whether or not group participants and therapists experienced intrapersonal effects as well as relational effects from meditating, both within and outside of session. Little research examines the relational impact of meditating, or the use of meditation as a strategy for helping couples who experienced intimate partner violence. Systems theory and existing research regarding mindfulness meditation contributed to the development of interview questions. Five group participants and four therapists who facilitated the Domestic Violence Focused Couples Treatment group within the last two years were interviewed. The main theme that had emerged from the study were the differences between meditating during session versus out of session for all study participants. In the study, it was noticed that group participants also experienced more relational effects then were noticed by the therapists. While the experience for the therapists and group participants varied, some similarities were found consistently through their interviews. Also included are a discussion of the connections between these themes and the existing literature, the strengths and limitations of this study, and the implications for future research.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartETDMastersThesis.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectmeditationen_US
dc.subjectintimate partner violence (IPV)en_US
dc.subjecttherapeutic relationshipen_US
dc.subjecteffects of meditationen_US
dc.subjectmindfulnessen_US
dc.titleMindfulness Meditation for Intimate Partner Violenceen_US
dc.typethesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHuman Developmenten_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairMcCollum, Eric E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSayre, Julia B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHuebner, Angela J.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05102009-185707/en_US


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