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dc.contributor.authorDeweber, Jefferson Tyrellen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:36:05Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:36:05Z
dc.date.issued2010-04-27en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05102010-150415en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32522
dc.description.abstractHuman alteration of the landscape for agricultural and urban land use has been linked to the degradation of streams and stream biota. Natural physical and climatic characteristics, or physiographic template, are important for determining natural land cover and constraining human land use, and are strongly related to stream habitat and stream biotic assemblages. Since the physiographic template differs among watersheds and is an important determinant of the processes being studied, it is important to account for these natural differences among watersheds so that the relationship between land cover and streams can be properly understood. The purpose of this thesis is to develop and assess the utility of a regional framework that classifies watersheds based on physical and climatic predictors of land cover. In Chapter 1, I identified physical and climatic predictors of land cover and classified watersheds into Land cover Distinguished Physiographic Regions (LDPRs) based on these predictors. I was able to identify and create classes based off eight climatic and landform characteristics that determined natural land cover and human land use patterns for both the Eastern and Western U.S. In Chapter 2, I utilized LDPRs to stratify a study region and investigated whether the relationships between land cover and stream fish assemblages varied between these regions. Five commonly used metrics covering trophic, reproductive and taxonomic groupings showed significant variation in their response to agricultural land use across LDPRs. The results suggest that the physiographic differences among LDPRs can result in different pathways by which land cover alterations impact stream fish communities. Unlike other commonly used regional frameworks, the rationale and methods used to develop LDPRs properly accounts for the causal relationship between physiography and land cover. Therefore, I recommend the use of LDPRs as a tool for stratifying watersheds based on physiography in future investigations so that the processes by which human land use results in stream degradation can be understood.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartDeweber_JT_T_2010.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectstream fish assemblagesen_US
dc.subjectphysiographic templateen_US
dc.subjectland coveren_US
dc.subjectregional frameworken_US
dc.subjectwatershed classificationen_US
dc.titleThe Role of Physiography in the Relationships Between Land Cover and Stream Fish Assemblagesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentFisheries and Wildlife Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairFrimpong, Emmanuel A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOrth, Donald J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGuo, Fengen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05102010-150415/en_US
dc.date.sdate2010-05-10en_US
dc.date.rdate2010-06-01
dc.date.adate2010-06-01en_US


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