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dc.contributor.authorPitts, Teresa Annen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:36:06Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:36:06Z
dc.date.issued2011-05-03en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05102011-153938en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32533
dc.description.abstractIn 1994 genocide occurred in the tiny, crowded country of Rwanda in the Great Lakes region of Africa. What was unique to that genocide was its efficiency and use of low technology weapons: somewhere around 800,000 to one million persons were killed, mainly by machetes and bullets, and often by neighbors, former friends, or relatives that they knew by name. The killers had been well-prepared for their roles via myth-building and reinforcement of old fears against the victims. There was little to no international intervention, although Rwanda had close political ties with France and a colonial history with Germany and Belgium. Although dozens of books and articles have been written seeking to understand, in both practical and theoretical ways, the motivations of the killers, this research looks to add to that body of knowledge by considering the ideas of a theorist outside traditional political theory â René Girard â and how they may shed some light on the 1994 Rwandan genocide. Girardâ s conception of mimetic rivalry and his theorization of scapegoating illuminate society-based characteristics of political competition between well-established factions of Rwandan society. These characteristics, if subjected to various manipulations of social positioning and control, can serve to precipitate brutal acts of believed conciliatory violence against a perceived causal group. Without examining the origin of violence in society, an understanding of the 1994 genocide is incomplete, and policies designed to prevent such genocides from recurring may not be effective.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartPITTS_TA_T_2011.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectmimesisen_US
dc.subjectRwandaen_US
dc.subjectgenocideen_US
dc.subjectRené Girarden_US
dc.subjectscapegoatingen_US
dc.titlePolitics as Violence: A Girardian Analysis of Pre-Genocide Rwandan Politicsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPolitical Scienceen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05102011-153938/en_US
dc.date.sdate2011-05-10en_US
dc.date.rdate2012-05-19
dc.date.adate2011-05-19en_US


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