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dc.contributor.authorAnthony, Lori A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:36:24Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:36:24Z
dc.date.issued2001-05-04en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05122001-093653en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32617
dc.description.abstractThe transformation of the office from the standard bullpen configuration to today's dynamic, flexible and open floorplans has required new design methodologies that incorporate tools and technologies that are readily available to interior designers. Moreover, the increased use of teams in the workplace challenges interior designers to create environments that accommodate group and individual tasks. This two-phased research study explored the use of a web-based pattern language as a new tool for designing and evaluating teaming spaces. Pattern language is a design formulation methodology developed in 1977 by Christopher Alexander and his associates. It consists of a series of interrelated physical elements combined to create a framework for design solutions. A web-based pattern language for teaming environments was created by this researcher and evaluated by an e-mail questionnaire sent to a sample of expert design professionals. The feedback from the survey was used to revise the existing language and was the tool used for phase two. This phase tested the pattern language against an existing teaming environment by having the researcher evaluate the space determining the inclusion of each pattern. A focus group was also surveyed and the results of both evaluations were compared for similarities. The results of phase one showed that of those design professionals surveyed, the majority believe pattern language could be a valuable design as well as evaluation tool. Phase two results showed similarities between the responses by the researcher compared with those of the focus group. In summary, pattern language may be a useful tool for the design and evaluation of teaming environments.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartetd.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectTeamingen_US
dc.subjectPattern Languageen_US
dc.subjectInterior Designen_US
dc.subjectOffice Designen_US
dc.titlePattern Language as a Design and Evaluation Tool for Teaming Environmentsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNear Environmentsen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNear Environmentsen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairMcLain-Kark, Joan H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFoti, Roseanne J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberParsons, Robert A.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05122001-093653/en_US
dc.date.sdate2001-05-12en_US
dc.date.rdate2002-05-12
dc.date.adate2001-05-12en_US


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