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dc.contributor.authorLoon, Leehuen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:36:26Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:36:26Z
dc.date.issued2003-04-24en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05122003-183033en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32625
dc.description.abstractSince the Depression era there has been an evolution in parkway usage. Parkways have outlived their recreational function and now must also serve as routes to recreational facilities. Since the elemental use of parkways has drastically changed, questions of how and why beg to be answered. How has parkway design and construction changed from the Depression era to today in terms of views, alignment, vegetation, natural and cultural features, and parkway details. How is parkway design and construction different from that of typical roadways; and how does this information effect the future design and construction of parkways? In addition, why can parkways no longer serve the same purpose that they did in the past? This thesis examines these questions through the creation of the Lorton - Laurel Hill Parkway. The main characteristics studied in this thesis will continue to be vital in future parkway design and construction. This thesis expresses that parkways can no longer serve as a destination, but instead must become an introduction to a recreational facility. Parkways will become increasingly important in the future as they can provide relief to congested roadways while simultaneously providing the motorist with an aesthetically pleasing entrance to recreational facilities. In the future, the components studied here must be instituted into highway and road engineering. The construction of motorways that incorporate parkway design principles will create more successful and vibrant routes between urban centers and their surrounding communities, and in so doing will increase the quality of life of its population.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspart02FrontMatter.pdfen_US
dc.relation.haspart01TitleMatter.pdfen_US
dc.relation.haspart03BodyMatter.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectvegetationen_US
dc.subjectlandscapeen_US
dc.subjecthorizontal alignmenten_US
dc.subjectviewsen_US
dc.subjectnatural featuresen_US
dc.subjectparkwaysen_US
dc.subjectvertical alignmenten_US
dc.subjectroad detailsen_US
dc.subjectcultural featuresen_US
dc.titleThe Future of Parkways in the Landscapeen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentLandscape Architectureen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Landscape Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Landscape Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLandscape Architectureen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairKagawa, Ronald M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMiller, Patrick A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKane, Brian P.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05122003-183033/en_US
dc.date.sdate2003-05-12en_US
dc.date.rdate2003-05-28
dc.date.adate2003-05-28en_US


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