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dc.contributor.authorMurray, Robert Paulen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:36:28Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:36:28Z
dc.date.issued2008-04-30en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05122008-003114en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32645
dc.description.abstractThis thesis argues that the significance of pre-Civil War southern opposition to slavery has been largely marginalized and mischaracterized by previous historiography. By contextualizing southern antislavery activism as but a single wing within a broader reformist movement, historians can move beyond simplistic interpretations of these antislavery advocates as fool-hardy and tangential â losers.â While opposition to slavery constituted a key goal for these reformers, it was not their only aspiration, and they secured considerable success in other aspects of reform. Nineteenth-century Russians, simultaneously struggling with their own system of bonded labor, offer excellent counterpoints to reorient the role of antebellum southern reformers. Through their shared commitment to reforming liberalism, a preference for gradualism as the vehicle of change, and a shared intellectual framework based upon new theories of political economy, the Russian and southernersâ histories highlight a transatlantic intellectual community in which southern reformers were full members. Adapting multiple theories from this transnational exchange of ideas, southern reformers were remarkably liminal figures useful for contemporary scholarly exploration into the nineteenth-century culture of reform. Ultimately, it was this liminality coupled with the inegalitarian nature of their movement that ensured that the southern antislavery movement would fail to secure a gradual demise to slavery.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartRPMurrayThesis.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectAntislavery Movementâ Southern Statesen_US
dc.subjectEmancipationâ Russiaen_US
dc.subjectGradualismen_US
dc.subjectIntellectual Movementsâ Nineteenth Centuryen_US
dc.subjectPolitical Economyâ Nineteenth Centuryen_US
dc.subjectReformismâ Nineteenth Centuryen_US
dc.subjectSerfdomâ Russiaen_US
dc.subjectSlaveryâ United Statesen_US
dc.subjectTransatlantic Communityâ Nineteenth Centuryen_US
dc.titleReform in the land of Serf and Slave, 1825-1861en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHistoryen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairNelson, Amyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWallenstein, Peter R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMollin, Marian B.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05122008-003114/en_US
dc.date.sdate2008-05-12en_US
dc.date.rdate2008-06-06
dc.date.adate2008-06-06en_US


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