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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Andrea Lynnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:36:38Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:36:38Z
dc.date.issued2008-04-28en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05132008-132951en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32704
dc.description.abstractIt is easy to overlook the individual features that constitute a community, including types and mix of land use, lot sizes, building type, size and height, setbacks, street and sidewalk widths, parking requirements, and infrastructure, all of which are controlled and regulated by land use development codes, more commonly referred to as zoning. Zoning is the primary means communities employ to control and guide land use and development decisions affecting the physical form of these places. However, zoning is a rigid, legal framework that separates uses and prescribes standards without describing or even considering what development will or should look like. Disenchantment with conventional zoning methods combined with innovative new approaches that address current and emerging issues are now readily available to learn from and adapt. A number of these approaches focus on design and form rather than use alone. The intentions of code reform focus on the creation of better public space, pedestrian friendly streets and communities, mixing uses and reducing parking requirements, all of which can lead to increased physical activity and healthy communities.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartSmith_ETD-Revisions.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectActive Livingen_US
dc.subjectBuilt Environmenten_US
dc.subjectMixed-Useden_US
dc.subjectNew Urbanismen_US
dc.subjectSprawlen_US
dc.subjectSmart Growthen_US
dc.subjectRecreational Physical Activityen_US
dc.subjectUtilitarian Physical Activityen_US
dc.titleHealthy Communities: Designing, Planning and ImplementinGen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUrban Affairs and Planningen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Landscape Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairKaten, Brian F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZahm, Diane L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMiller, Patrick A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRichardson, Jesse J.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05132008-132951/en_US
dc.date.sdate2008-05-13en_US
dc.date.rdate2008-06-05
dc.date.adate2008-06-05en_US


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