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dc.contributor.authorBurgess, Melissa Fayeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:36:43Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:36:43Z
dc.date.issued2011-05-02en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05132011-142443en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32728
dc.description.abstractThis study seeks to explore variations in the development of racial identities for multiracial Virginians in the 21st century by focusing on the roles that physical appearance, group associations and social networks, family and region play in the process. Simultaneously, this study seeks to explore the presence of autonomy in the racial identity development process. Using Michael Omi and Howard Winantâ s racial formation theory as the framework, I argue that a racial project termed biracialism, defined as the increase in the levels of autonomy in self identification, holds the potential to contribute to transformations in racial understandings in U.S. society by opposing imposed racial categorization. Through the process of conducting and analyzing semistructured interviews with mixed-race Virginia Tech students I conclude that variations do exist in the identities they develop and that the process of identity development is significantly affected by the factors of physical appearance, group associations and social networks, family and region. Furthermore, I find that while some individuals display racial autonomy, others find themselves negotiating between their self-images and societyâ s perceptions or do not display it at all. In addition to these conclusions, the issues of acknowledging racism, the prevalence of whiteness, assimilation and socialization also emerged as contributors to the identity development process for the multiracial population.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartBurgess_MF_T_2011.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectmultiracialen_US
dc.subjectidentityen_US
dc.subjectautonomyen_US
dc.subjectwhitenessen_US
dc.subjectsocializationen_US
dc.title"You Can't Put People In One Category Without Any Shades of Gray:" A Study of Native American, Black, Asian, Latino/a and White Multiracial Identityen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentSociologyen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGillman, Laura J.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05132011-142443/en_US
dc.contributor.committeecochairHarrison, Anthony Kwameen_US
dc.contributor.committeecochairSeniors, Paulaen_US
dc.date.sdate2011-05-13en_US
dc.date.rdate2011-06-06
dc.date.adate2011-06-06en_US


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