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dc.contributor.authorMason, Jr., Robert Wallaceen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:36:57Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:36:57Z
dc.date.issued2005-05-09en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05152005-121838en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32799
dc.description.abstractThe US-led war to oust the regime of Saddam Hussein elicited a wide range of responses among liberal states, from active diplomatic opposition in the prelude to war to actual combat support once hostilities commenced. These divergent responses, in part, reflected different perceptions of the legitimacy of force and international law. Furthermore, I contend that these perceptions are rooted in the unique regional security environment in which each state is situated, with states located in relatively insecure regional environments being more favorably disposed to view US military preponderance and use of force as a legitimate public good. Consequently, I hypothesize that the more insecure a stateâ s regional security environment, the more likely it was to support, either diplomatically or militarily, the â major combatâ phase of Operation Iraqi Freedom. To this end, I develop a measure of regional security based on concepts of power and polarity adapted from John Mearsheimerâ s The Tragedy of Great Power Politics. I then test this measure using a logistic regression analysis for 85 states located in 10 regions. The results indicate support for the hypothesis, but also illuminate the need for more research on the implications of power distributions within regional settings for international conflict in the post-Cold War era.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartbibliography&vita.pdfen_US
dc.relation.haspartThesis-revised.pdfen_US
dc.relation.haspartTables-revised.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectpolarityen_US
dc.subjectland poweren_US
dc.subjectneorealismen_US
dc.subjectpreponderanceen_US
dc.subjectparityen_US
dc.titleThe Effect of Regional Security Environments on State Attitudes Regarding the Use of Force and International Law: A Quantitative Analysis Utilizing International Positions on Operation Iraqi Freedomen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairNelson, Scott C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberClement, Christopher I.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLuke, Timothy W.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05152005-121838/en_US
dc.date.sdate2005-05-15en_US
dc.date.rdate2008-05-24
dc.date.adate2005-05-24en_US


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