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dc.contributor.authorVanDyke, Matthew Stevenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:37:06Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:37:06Z
dc.date.issued2012-05-01en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05152012-235358en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32837
dc.description.abstractRecent calls in environmental communication literature suggest researchers should understand the relationships between media message content, message construction, and audience effects. This thesis analyzed environmental advertising frames over time to inform strategic environmental communication research and practice. The study was a media content analysis guided by framing theory. Framing theory asserts the construction of media messages involves the selection and salience of particular message characteristics (Entman, 1993). Thus, the analysis examined the characteristics of environmental advertisements (N=449) published in Newsweek, Time, and U.S. News and World Report in 1990, 2000, and 2010. Advertisements were classified based on whether the environmental appeal was issue-specific (e.g., pollution, species/habitat protection) or generic. Findings indicate that responsibility frames were overwhelmingly dominant as the strategy used to advertise products, goods and services. The responsibility frame was also prevalent in issue-specific ads. Macro-frames, which attempt to identify organizing lenses through which environmental advertising appeals are advanced, were not present in advertisements at significant levels during the time periods analyzed. The species/habitat protection issue was the dominant issue in 1990, while energy efficiency was the prevalent issue in 2000 and 2010. Advertisements appearing in the newsmagazine pages primarily were sponsored by for-profit organizations. Environmental advertisements had an overwhelmingly positive valence over time. Results have implications for future environmental communication research exploring media content and effects, public opinion and persuasion, and strategic communication practice.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartVanDyke_MS_T_2012.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectenvironmental advertisingen_US
dc.subjectU.S. newsmagazinesen_US
dc.subjectcontent analysisen_US
dc.subjectframing theoryen_US
dc.titleAn Analysis of Environmental Advertising Frames from 1990 to 2010en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentCommunication Studiesen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunication Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairTedesco, John C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCannon, Douglas F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHolloway, Rachel L.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05152012-235358/en_US
dc.date.sdate2012-05-15en_US
dc.date.rdate2012-06-04
dc.date.adate2012-06-04en_US


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