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dc.contributor.authorBea, Alexanderen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:37:12Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:37:12Z
dc.date.issued2009-05-01en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05162009-172322en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32870
dc.description.abstractThe study of blogs up to this point has primarily, though not exclusively, covered â A-listâ and political or campaign blogs. Large filter blogs have not yet been the focus of communication research and offer an exciting new area of scholarship in online communication. This study examined if and how the environmental blog, TreeHugger, works to engage and maintain the online environmental community by potentially acting an online environmental public sphere and interacting with users who make up the community. Through a content analysis of two constructed weeks of blog posts (N=336) and their comments (N=1342) from the first half of 2008, this study examined the discussion of issues, use of interactive feature, and presence of the metacommunication frame in both groups. Results showed significant influence of topic and tone in the blog posts on the subsequent user comments. They also showed how commentersâ discussion can operate quite independently as well. In particular, comments were found to have a negative valence significantly more than the posts. Also, the focus of external metacommunication frames in each differed significantly, with posts referencing other mass media more often. Overall, this thesis concludes that writers for blogs like TreeHugger have limited influence on the discussion in the comments. Greater understanding of that influence could help bloggers engage readers better and promote active dialogue.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartBea_Thesis_completed_ETD_revisions.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectblogen_US
dc.subjectblog postsen_US
dc.subjectblog commentsen_US
dc.subjectenvironmenten_US
dc.subjectframingen_US
dc.subjectinteractivityen_US
dc.subjectInterneten_US
dc.subjectmetacommunicationen_US
dc.subjectpublic sphereen_US
dc.subjectTreeHuggeren_US
dc.titleTreeHugging users: Engagement in an online green communityen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentCommunication Studiesen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunication Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairTedesco, John C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMackay, Jennifer B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPrince, Stephen R.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05162009-172322/en_US
dc.date.sdate2009-05-16en_US
dc.date.rdate2009-06-12
dc.date.adate2009-06-12en_US


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