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dc.contributor.authorHaac, Thomas Ryanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:37:24Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:37:24Z
dc.date.issued2010-05-03en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05172010-093724en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32921
dc.description.abstractCommercial aircraft are subject to noise regulations imposed by the Federal Aviation Administration. Currently, the FAA limits overland flight of supersonic airplanes due to the negative effect of the sonic boom on communities. The annoyance produced by the impulsive signature of sonic booms, particularly indoors, cannot exceed that of the broadband, low-overpressure noise produced by subsonic airplanes for the restriction to be lifted. Therefore, the ability to understand and accurately reproduce the acoustic response of a sonic boom is important for psychoacoustic classification of their tolerability within residences. This thesis presents and interprets results of the propagation and transmission of simulated sonic booms incident on wood-framed structures. The testing environment, sonic boom simulation method, and associated instrumentation are described. The effects of the traveling blast on the structure are investigated through pressure loading and structural response measurements. The ensuing interior acoustic responses for several different configurations are presented, including the effects of room cavity interaction and exposure of the room cavities to the traveling wave through an open door. Calculated transfer functions between the interior acoustic response and the free-field incident wave are computed to assess the extent to which wood-framed buildings transmit energy to their cavities. In all cases tested, significant transmission of the sonic boomâ s low frequency content into the structures was apparent through direct apertures and the excitation of structural components. The data show that sonic booms provide significant excitation of structural and acoustic modes that drives the interior acoustic response in residential structures.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartHaac_TR_T_2010.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectinterior acoustic response.en_US
dc.subjectpressure loadingen_US
dc.subjectstructural forcingen_US
dc.subjectsonic boom simulationen_US
dc.subjectSonic boomen_US
dc.titleExperimental Characterization and Analysis of Simple Residential Structures Subjected to Simulated Sonic Boomsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairBurdisso, Ricardo A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReichard, Georgen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWest, Robert L. Jr.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05172010-093724/en_US
dc.date.sdate2010-05-17en_US
dc.date.rdate2010-06-07
dc.date.adate2010-06-07en_US


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