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dc.contributor.authorCuppett, Jonathan Daviden_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:37:36Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:37:36Z
dc.date.issued2005-05-11en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05192005-211753en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32991
dc.description.abstractCorrosion of household copper plumbing infrastructure can cause pipe failure and lead to elevated levels of copper in drinking water which can exceed the USEPA health based standard for copper in drinking water of 1.3 mg/L Cu. The purpose of this study was to determine taste thresholds of copper in different types of water, analyze how copper chemistry can affect tasting, determine if common disinfectants influence the taste of copper and evaluate genetic links to copper sensitivity. A one-out-of-five test was used to define thresholds, evaluate disinfectant influences, and examine copper chemistry differences. A difference from control test was used to analyze soluble copper tasting and a one solution test with visual classification was used to discriminate 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) taster status.

Solutions containing copper sulfate (0.05 â 8 mg/l Cu) were prepared in distilled water, mineral water of varying pH and mineral water with disinfectant added. Geometric mean copper taste thresholds were 0.48 mg Cu/l and 0.41mg Cu/l in distilled and mineral water pH 7.4 respectively. Logistic regression copper taste thresholds were 1.50 mg Cu/l and 1.96 mg Cu/l in distilled and mineral water pH 7.4 respectively. Soluble copper was readily tasted while particulate copper was poorly tasted. Chlorine and chloramines dosed at typical tap water levels had no significant effect on panelistsâ tasting abilities for water containing 1 mg/l total copper. Geometric mean copper thresholds values did not correlate with (PROP) status so PROP sensitivity would not be a good indicator for copper sensitivity.

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dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartthesis.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectcorrosionen_US
dc.subjecttasteen_US
dc.subjectcopperen_US
dc.subjectchloraminesen_US
dc.subjectchlorineen_US
dc.subjectPROPen_US
dc.subjectthresholdsen_US
dc.titleEvaluating factors that affect copper tasting sensitivity in drinking wateren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Sciences and Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnvironmental Sciences and Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairDietrich, Andrea M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEdwards, Marc A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDuncan, Susan E.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05192005-211753/en_US
dc.date.sdate2005-05-19en_US
dc.date.rdate2012-11-20
dc.date.adate2005-05-27en_US


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