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dc.contributor.authorDale, Margaret Elizabethen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:37:49Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:37:49Z
dc.date.issued2003-05-01en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05212003-113924en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/33056
dc.description.abstractHOUSE LEGENDS AND PERCEPTIONS OF THE CIVIL WAR: A MULTIPLE CASE STUDY ON THE CIVIL WAR LEGENDS TOLD ABOUT ANTEBELLUM HOUSES IN THE NEW RIVER VALLEY, ROANOKE VALLEY, AND NEARBY COUNTIES OF VIRGINIA by Margaret Elizabeth Dale Committee Chairperson: Marilyn D. Casto Interior Design (ABSTRACT) This study was designed to identify recurring themes in Civil War legends that are told in reference to antebellum homes in regions of Southwest Virginia. Existing literature indicates that collecting these legends is an important task because doing so helps others to better understand the community of legend-tellers. Previous research has also indicated that legends form a type of American mythology with reveals the way the legend-tellers perceive the specific subject they describe in the legends. Eight historic homes were visited in six southwestern counties of Virginia. Qualitative data were collected from a purposive sample of 12 participants who lived in these houses, previously lived in an historic house, or worked in an historic house museum. Each house was chosen as a site of inquiry because it has some significance for those interested in the Civil War or because it represents typical houses in similar southwestern Virginian communities during the Civil War era. In-depth interviews were the sole means of data collection and provided detailed and unlimited legends used to identify themes. The data were collected analyzed using a multiple case study approach. The findings from this study indicate that Civil War legends are being told in reference to antebellum homes in Southwest Virginia. Additionally, the tellers of the legends have common thoughts about the Civil War. The three major conclusions made in this study are (1) northern soldiers were aggressors during the Civil War; (2) southerners were strong during the Civil War; and (3) ghosts and ghostly activity serve as reminders of the Civil War. By continuing to share these legends, the tellers indicate their own perspectives of the Civil War as well as the perspectives of those who originate the legends. The legend-tellers also provide insight into the culture of todayâ s southwestern Virginians as well as the Civil War era southwestern Virginians.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartthesis.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectSouthwest Virginiaen_US
dc.subjectAntebellumen_US
dc.subjectHouse Legendsen_US
dc.subjectLegenden_US
dc.subjectCivil Waren_US
dc.titleHouse Legends and Perceptions of the Civil War: a Multiple Case Study on the Civil War Legends Told About Antebellum Homes in the New River Valley, Roanoke Valley, and Nearby Counties of Virginiaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHousing, Interior Design, and Resource Managementen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHousing, Interior Design, and Resource Managementen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairCasto, Marilyn D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTucker, Lisa M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcLain-Kark, Joan H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurge, Penny L.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05212003-113924/en_US
dc.date.sdate2003-05-21en_US
dc.date.rdate2003-06-12
dc.date.adate2003-06-12en_US


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