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dc.contributor.authorBrown, Preston Hunteren_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:38:17Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:38:17Z
dc.date.issued2009-04-03en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05222009-104032en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/33122
dc.description.abstractFew studies have evaluated the community dynamics of pest ant species in tropical urban environments. Pest ant community dynamics were examined within three Puerto Rican housing developments. Housing developments (one, four, and eight years old), representing different stages of urban succession were sampled to determine which species were present and the relative species abundance. Eight trips were made to Puerto Rico over a one-year period, and more than 1,000 samples were collected during each trip. The ants collected in each sample were counted and identified. A total of 25 different species were identified from the developments, with the major pest species being big-headed, rover, and red imported fire ants (RIFA). Fourteen different species were identified from the one-year-old site. However, RIFA and rover ants were the most abundant, accounting for >75% of ants collected. In the four-year-old site, 20 species were identified. However, three species (RIFA, big-headed, and destructive trailing ants) were dominant, accounting for >75% of ants collected. Sampling data from the eight-year-old site indicated that out of 21 species identified, four species were dominant (RIFA, crazy, and two species of big-headed ants) and accounted for >75% of the ants collected. The dominant species within each site were different, indicating that the pest ant community changed during the stages of succession. However, these dominant species did not specifically impact the distribution of other species within the same site. Spatial analysis indicated that the number of species coexisting within a site increased as the age of the development increased.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartPreston.Brown.Masters.Thesis.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectSuccessionen_US
dc.subjectPuerto Ricoen_US
dc.subjectDiversityen_US
dc.subjectAntsen_US
dc.titleSpatiotemporal Composition of Pest Ant Species in the Residential Environments of Santa Isabel, Puerto Ricoen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEntomologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science In the Life Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairMiller, Dini M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFell, Richard D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrewster, Carlyle C.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05222009-104032/en_US
dc.date.sdate2009-05-22en_US
dc.date.rdate2009-06-15
dc.date.adate2009-06-15en_US


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