Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBlier, Heather K.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:39:15Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:39:15Z
dc.date.issued2001-05-04en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-06032001-115204en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/33392
dc.description.abstractRecent efforts to understand and predict the onset and maintenance of aggression have considered the heterogeneity of this behavior. Dodge (1980) and others, have suggested a distinction in aggression based on two primary subtypes: reactive and proactive aggression. The form, severity and persistence of these aggressive subtypes may depend on an on-going interaction between individual characteristics and environmental characteristics that elicit varying antecedents and consequences (Frick, 1998; Lahey et al., 1999). In particular, there exists some empirical support for the existence of relations among social likeability, attributional style, and particular subtypes of aggression symptomology. However, the exact nature of this relation is unclear. The current study examined two competing models, the mediator and moderator models, to assess the nature of the relations among social likeability, attributional style, and aggression subtypes in a sample of 419 youth in a non-clinical community setting. Results suggest that the external, stable, global attributional style serves to mediate the relation between social likeability and reactive, but not proactive aggression. Implications for assessment and treatment of aggression in adolescents are discussed.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartblier.etd.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectAdolescentsen_US
dc.subjectProactiveen_US
dc.subjectAggressionen_US
dc.subjectReactiveen_US
dc.subjectAttributional Styleen_US
dc.titleSocial Likeability, Subtypes of Aggression, and the Attributional Style of Aggressive Youthen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairOllendick, Thomas H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStephens, Robert S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJones, Russell T.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-06032001-115204/en_US
dc.date.sdate2001-06-03en_US
dc.date.rdate2002-07-14
dc.date.adate2001-07-14en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record