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dc.contributor.authorVadala, Timothy Patricken_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:39:34Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:39:34Z
dc.date.issued2010-05-24en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-06072010-112834en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/33472
dc.description.abstractMany pathogenic bacteria can enter phagocytic cells and replicate in them, and these intracellular bacteria are difficult to treat because the recommended antibiotics do not transport into the cells efficiently. Examples include food-borne bacteria such as Salmonella and Listeria as well as more toxic bacteria such as Brucella and the Mycobacteria that lead to tuberculosis. Current treatments utilize aminoglycoside antibiotics that are polar and positively charged and such drugs do not enter the cells in sufficient concentrations to eradicate the intracellular infections. We have developed core-shell polymeric drug delivery vehicles containing gentamicin to potentially overcome this challenge. Pentablock and diblock copolymers comprised of amphiphilic nonionic polyether blocks and anionic poly(sodium acrylate) blocks have been complexed with the cationic aminoglycoside gentamicin. The electrostatic interaction between the anionic polyacrylates and the cationic aminoglycosides form the cores of the nanoplexes, while the amphiphilic nature of the polyethers stabilize their dispersion in physiological media. The amphiphilic nature of the polyethers in the outer shell aid in interaction of the nanoplexes with extra- and intra-cellular components and help to protect the electrostatic core from any physiological media. This thesis investigates the electrostatic cooperativity between the anionic polyacrylates and cationic aminoglycosides and evaluated the release rates of gentamicin as a function of pH.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartVadala_TP_T_2010.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectbacteriaen_US
dc.subjectbrucellaen_US
dc.subjectatom transfer radical polymerizationen_US
dc.subjectpolyetheren_US
dc.subjectcore-shellen_US
dc.subjectATRPen_US
dc.titleCooperative Electrostatic Polymer-Antibiotic Nanoplexesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMacromolecular Science and Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMacromolecular Science and Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairRiffle, Judy S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDavis, Richey M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTurner, S. Richarden_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-06072010-112834/en_US
dc.date.sdate2010-06-07en_US
dc.date.rdate2013-05-21
dc.date.adate2010-06-24en_US


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