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dc.contributor.authorMuller, Christopher Dustinen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:40:14Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:40:14Z
dc.date.issued2001-05-29en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-06192001-143911en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/33650
dc.description.abstractBy shearing activated sludge using a high shear rotor stator device, bioavailable proteinaceous material can be produced. Operation at elevated temperatures, serves to increase the amount of material that is rendered soluble (<0.45 um) and biodegradable. The storage of sludge under anoxic condition prior to shearing does not appear to enhance solublization of solids, though deflocculation and deterioration of dewaterablility was observed. Anaerobic digestibility appears to be enhanced by the addition of a high shear as shown by increases in gas production and volatile solids destruction. The dewatering properties of activated sludge, measured by capillary suction time, deteriorated with the addition of sheared solids, but reaeration resulted in near complete recovery. The role of iron and iron chemistry plays a critical role in the activated sludge. Iron apparently selectively removes protein, in particular material ranging in the 1.5 um to 30K size range. The addition of ferric iron was found to increase SVI and decrease zone-settling velocity, when added to reactors with mechanically disintegrated sludges. Similar trends were not observed in reactors dosed with ferrous iron. Preliminary results suggest that the ferric/ferrous redox chemistry may serve to enhance floc structure, as observed by increased settling velocity and shear resistance for sludges dosed with ferrous sulfate.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartThesis.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectbiodegradationen_US
dc.subjectsolids reductionen_US
dc.subjectfloc structureen_US
dc.subjectdisintegrationen_US
dc.subjectironen_US
dc.titleHigh-Intensity Shear as a Wet Sludge Disintegration Technology and a Mechanism for Floc Structure Analysisen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Sciences and Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnvironmental Sciences and Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairNovak, John T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRandall, Clifford W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLove, Nancy G.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-06192001-143911/en_US
dc.date.sdate2001-06-19en_US
dc.date.rdate2004-06-19
dc.date.adate2001-06-19en_US


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