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dc.contributor.authorLacour, Nicholas Alexanderen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:40:20Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:40:20Z
dc.date.issued2012-06-19en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-06212012-173141en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/33680
dc.description.abstractTraditionally, coal combustion residuals (CCRs) were disposed of with little engineering consideration. Initially, common practice was to use a wet-scrubbing system to cut down on emissions of fly ash from the combustion facilities, where the ash materials were sluiced to the disposal facility and allowed to sediment out, forming deep deposits of meta-stable ash. As the life of the disposal facility progressed, new phases of the impoundment were constructed, often using the upstream method. One such facility experienced a massive slope stability failure on December 22, 2008 in Kingston, Tennessee, releasing millions of cubic yards of impounded ash material into the Watts Bar reservoir and damaging surrounding property. This failure led to the call for new federal regulations on CCR disposal areas and led coal burning facilities to seek out geotechnical consultants to review and help in the future design of their disposal facilities. CCRs are not a natural soil, nor a material that many geotechnical engineers deal with on a regular basis, so this thesis focuses on compiling engineering characteristics of CCRs determined by different researchers, while also reviewing current engineering practice when dealing with CCR disposal facilities. Since the majority of coal-burning facilities used the sluicing method to dispose of CCRs at one point, many times it is desirable to construct new "dry-disposal" phases above the retired ash impoundments; since in-situ sampling of CCRs is difficult and likely produces highly disturbed samples, a sample reconstitution technique is also presented for use in triaxial testing of surface impounded CCRs.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartLacour_NA_T_2012.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectcoal combustion residualsen_US
dc.subjectfly ashen_US
dc.subjectbottom ashen_US
dc.subjectsurface impoundmentsen_US
dc.titleEngineering Characteristics of Coal Combustion Residuals and a Reconstitution Technique for Triaxial Samplesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentCivil Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairRodriguez-Marek, Adrianen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDove, Joseph E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMartin, James R. IIen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-06212012-173141/en_US
dc.date.sdate2012-06-21en_US
dc.date.rdate2012-07-05
dc.date.adate2012-07-05en_US


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