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dc.contributor.authorSpradlin, Jamie Lynnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:40:21Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:40:21Z
dc.date.issued2006-05-09en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-06222006-153724en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/33686
dc.description.abstractVictimization and hate crimes are becoming more prominent on Americaâ s college campuses. Indeed, nearly 20,000 crimes of violence, and over 600 hate crimes, occurred on and around university campuses in 2003 (Department of Education 2004). Given its inverse relationship to crime at the aggregate level, (Sampson et al 1997), one possible means of reversing this trend would be to increase levels of collective efficacy across U.S. campuses. The purpose of this research is to determine if an individualâ s tolerance of diversity is related to their willingness to intervene in criminal or potentially criminal situations. That is, is tolerance of diversity related to collective efficacy at Virginia Tech? The research on collective efficacy is based on neighborhood level variables. This research, conducted in the â neighborhoodâ of Virginia Tech, focuses on collective efficacy and tolerance of diversity at the individual level. This research is unique in that it fills gaps in existing literature; to date, no research has analyzed the potential causes of collective efficacy at the individual level. Participants in this study will be asked to complete a survey regarding issues of diversity, tolerance and integration, and sense of belonging to community. The results will then be analyzed in order to gain some insight into this phenomenon. The main questions that will be explored in this research are: Does an individualâ s sense of belonging to his or her community and tolerance of diversity lead to their willingness to intervene if they see someone doing something wrong? That is, is sense of belonging to community and tolerance of diversity related to collective efficacy? Routine Activities Theory and studies of Collective Efficacy will be used to explore these questions.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartJamieThesis.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectsocial controlen_US
dc.subjectneighborhood controlen_US
dc.subjectand Snipesen_US
dc.subjectBernarden_US
dc.subjectVolden_US
dc.subjectCohen and Felsonen_US
dc.titleTolerance of Diversity, Collective Efficacy, and Criminal Victimization on a College Campusen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentSociologyen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairShoemaker, Donald J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHawdon, James E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYuan, Anastasia Sue Vogten_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-06222006-153724/en_US
dc.date.sdate2006-06-22en_US
dc.date.rdate2006-08-15
dc.date.adate2006-08-15en_US


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