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dc.contributor.authorMatthews, Bonnie L. C.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:40:25Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:40:25Z
dc.date.issued2005-03-18en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-06232005-182633en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/33708
dc.description.abstractHardwood management has been discouraged because of long rotations, low stumpage values, expensive treatments, and an undependable market (Bechtold and Phillips 1983). Knowledge gaps on how various biological factors affect hardwood growth also exist. Stand improvement methods attempt to shift growth to desirable stems. Three different hardwood stand improvement treatments were evaluated. A pre-commercial chemical thin occurred in a twelve year old stand in 1990. In 1995, two of the treatments showed a significant increase in dbh over the control. However, the 2004 measurements of the stand did not find any significant differences between treatments. A case study examined paired plots throughout the state of Virginia where the crown touching crop tree release method was applied. In both the Piedmont and Ridge and Valley regions of the state an increase in dbh was observed. Finally, a timber stand improvement study examined different treatments in a 60-80 year old stand, but did not result in any significant increases in volume after three years. When oaks are harvested or a major disturbance occurs, the number of oaks that regenerates is less than there were previously (Smith 1992). Therefore, oak regeneration is a problem and methods are needed to facilitate oak regeneration (Smith 1992). One method of oak regeneration was examined. Burning five years after a deferment cut did not result in significantly more stems of oak regeneration. Various reductions in basal area also did not result in an increase in oak regeneration under our 60-80 year old timber stand improvement study. These studies attempt to close knowledge gaps in hardwood management and provide useful information for non-industrial private forest (NIPF) landowners. It is so important to target NIPF landowners because the 350 million acres of timberland they own will play a large part in the future of the United States timber supply (Haynes 2002).en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartBLCMatthews_thesis_071505.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjecttimber stand improvementen_US
dc.subjecthardwoodsen_US
dc.subjectoak regenerationen_US
dc.titleSilvicultural Methods for Improving Hardwood Management on Non-Industrial Private Forest land in Virginiaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentForestryen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineForestryen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairZedaker, Shepard M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFox, Thomas R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnson, James E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberScrivani, John A.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-06232005-182633/en_US
dc.date.sdate2005-06-23en_US
dc.date.rdate2005-07-21
dc.date.adate2005-07-21en_US


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