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dc.contributor.authorBibby, Emily Katherineen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:40:29Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:40:29Z
dc.date.issued2009-06-10en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-06242009-231445en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/33733
dc.description.abstractFor over three decades, during the height of Gilded Age economic extravagance, the women of New York High Society maintained an elite social identity by possessing, displaying, and cultivating cultural capital. Particularly, High Society women sought to exclude the Nouveaux Riches who, after amassing vast fortunes in industry or trade, came to New York City in search of social position. High Society women distinguished themselves from these social climbers by obeying restrictive codes of speech, body language, and dress that were the manifestations of their cultural capital. However, in a country founded upon an ethos of egalitarianism, exclusivity could not be maintained for long. Mass-circulated media, visual artwork, and etiquette manuals celebrated the Society womanâ s cultural capital, but simultaneously popularized it, making it accessible to the upwardly mobile. By imitating the representations of High Society life that they saw in newspapers, magazines, and the sketches of Charles Dana Gibson, Nouveau Riche social climbers and even aspirant middle and working class women bridged many of the barriers that Society women sought to impose.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartEKBMMastersThesis.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectCultural Capitalen_US
dc.subjectDressen_US
dc.subjectCulture of Aspirationen_US
dc.subjectCulture of Consumptionen_US
dc.subjectHigh Societyen_US
dc.subjectNew York Cityen_US
dc.subjectSpeechen_US
dc.subjectPostureen_US
dc.subjectWomenen_US
dc.subjectSpaceen_US
dc.subjectGilded Ageen_US
dc.titleMaking the American Aristocracy: Women, Cultural Capital, and High Society in New York City, 1870-1900en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHistoryen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairJones, Kathleen W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEwing, E. Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnson, Sharonen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-06242009-231445/en_US
dc.date.sdate2009-06-24en_US
dc.date.rdate2009-07-06
dc.date.adate2009-07-06en_US


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