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dc.contributor.authorStanley, William Leonarden_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:41:37Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:41:37Z
dc.date.issued2012-05-29en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-07182012-122142en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/34054
dc.description.abstractMethods for woody plant herbicide screening were assayed with the goal of reducing resources and time required to conduct screenings for new products. Past studies have demonstrated reductions in required screening resources (time, amount of herbicide active ingredient, and size of seedlings) can be achieved relative to field exclosure screenings. Rapid screening methods including, greenhouse seedling screening, germinal screening, and seed screening were performed using triclopyr and 8 experimental herbicides supplied by Dow AgroSciences (DAS). Five woody species were included in screenings: black locust, loblolly pine, red maple, sweetgum, and water oak. Two groups of seedlings were used in greenhouse screening: 1-year-old (1-0) and 2-year-old (2-0). Seedling age was not calendar years, but was the number of greenhouse growing seasons seedlings experienced prior to herbicide treatment. Height and mortality responses showed that 1-0 seedlings were more susceptible to herbicide injury than 2-0 seedlings. Significant linear regression models were produced correlating 1-0 seedling pre-dormancy with post dormancy responses, shortening the length of that screening to 11 weeks from treatment to results. Species and herbicide specific models were produced correlating 2-0 seedling responses to 1-0 seedling data, germinal responses to 1-0 seedling data, and seed responses to 1-0 seedling data. 1-0 seedling pre to post dormancy predictions were more successful than other models. Results suggest that rapid screening methods have some usefulness in early stages of product development to determine herbicide activity and spectrum of efficacy to guide planning of larger scale field trials, resulting in savings of time and resources.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartStanley_WL_T_2012_2.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectindustrial vegetation managementen_US
dc.subjectforestryen_US
dc.titleMethods for Rapid Screening in Woody Plant Herbicide Developmenten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentForest Resources and Environmental Conservationen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineForest Resources and Environmental Conservationen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWestwood, James H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurch, Patrick L.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-07182012-122142/en_US
dc.contributor.committeecochairZedaker, Shepard M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeecochairSeiler, John R.en_US
dc.date.sdate2012-07-18en_US
dc.date.rdate2012-08-08
dc.date.adate2012-08-08en_US


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