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dc.contributor.authorVan Den Bos, Amelie Caraen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:41:48Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:41:48Z
dc.date.issued2003-07-01en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-07232003-134500en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/34117
dc.description.abstractThe Occoquan Reservoir is a public water supply in northern Virginia. The Occoquan Watershed has developed over the years from rural land uses to metropolitan suburbs within easy commuting distance from Washington, DC. Due to this urbanization, the Occoquan Reservoir is especially vulnerable to hypereutrophication, which results in problems such as algal blooms (including cyanobacteria), periodic fish kills, and taste and odor problems. In the 1970's, a new management plan for the Occoquan Reservoir called for the construction of the Upper Occoquan Sewage Authority (UOSA), an advanced wastewater treatment plant that would take extraordinary measures for highly reliable and highly efficient removal of particulates, organics, nutrients, and pathogens. Eliminating most of the water quality problems associated with point source discharges in the watershed, this state-of-the-art treatment is the foundation for the successful indirect surface water reuse system in the Occoquan Reservoir today. A limnological analysis of thirty years of water quality monitoring data from the reservoir and its two primary tributaries shows that the majority of the nutrient and sediment load to the reservoir comes from nonpoint sources, which are closely tied to hydrometeorologic conditions. Reservoir water quality trends are very similar to trends in stream water quality, and the tributary in the most urbanized part of the watershed, Bull Run, has been identified as the main contributor of sediment and nutrients to the reservoir. Despite significant achievements in maintaining the reservoir as a source of high quality drinking water, the reservoir remains a phosphorus-limited eutrophic waterbody.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartVanDenBos_thesis.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectreclaimed wateren_US
dc.subjectOccoquanen_US
dc.subjectreservoir managementen_US
dc.subjectpotable water reuseen_US
dc.subjecteutrophicationen_US
dc.subjectwater qualityen_US
dc.titleA Water Quality Assessment of the Occoquan Reservoir and its Tributary Watershed: 1973-2002en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnvironmental Planningen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairGrizzard, Thomas J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBott, Charles B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGodrej, Adil N.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-07232003-134500/en_US
dc.date.sdate2003-07-23en_US
dc.date.rdate2004-07-29
dc.date.adate2003-07-29en_US


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