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dc.contributor.authorSchlosser, Gary L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:42:03Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:42:03Z
dc.date.issued1999-05-12en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-072699-203606en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/34197
dc.description.abstractIn the promotion of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) as an alternative to pesticides, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the Office of International Research and Development (OIRD) at Virginia Tech, and the Caribbean Agricultural Research and Development Institute (CARDI) supported my research to uncover the socio-economic constraints to IPM adoption and to determine the amount of gendered participation in three rural Jamaica farming communities. The thesis examines the gendered participation in crop production, marketing, and decision making as well as the ability of farmers to identify key pests of three nontraditional agricultural exports: callaloo, "Scotch Bonnet" hot pepper, and sweet potato. While men generally participated to a greater extent in crop production and decision making, women also made a significant contribution. Less female participation is due in part to women owning, renting, or leasing a smaller amount of land. However, decision making about income derived from farming was found to be almost equally split between males and females. Another important finding is that women were able to identify key crop pests. To facilitate the introduction of IPM in the three communities, the small-scale farmers' limited access to irrigation and markets must be addressed. Moreover, the thesis advocates that instead of the singular focus on pest control, the holistic spirit of IPM should be seen as the catalyst for an overall integrated approach to rural farm development.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartthesis_body.pdfen_US
dc.relation.hasparttitle.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the right to archive and to make available my thesis or dissertation in whole or in part in the University Libraries in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all proprietary rights, such as patent rights. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis or dissertation.en_US
dc.subjectGenderen_US
dc.subjectIntegrated Pest Managementen_US
dc.subjectSmall-Scale Agricultureen_US
dc.subjectJamaicaen_US
dc.titleGendered Production Roles and Integrated Pest Management in Three Jamaican Farming Communitiesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGeographyen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairRichardson, Bonham C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHamilton, Sarahen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGrossman, Lawrence S.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-072699-203606/en_US
dc.date.sdate1999-07-26en_US
dc.date.rdate2000-07-30
dc.date.adate1999-07-30en_US


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