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dc.contributor.authorPittman, Judd R.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:42:11Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:42:11Z
dc.date.issued2005-07-15en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-07292005-165101en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/34240
dc.description.abstractCoarse woody debris (CWD) plays an influential role in forested ecosystems by adding organic matter to soils, stabilizing the soil environment, providing wildlife habitat, preventing soil erosion, providing seedling establishment habitat, and involvement in the nutrient cycle. Most CWD research has been conducted in old-growth and unmanaged, second-growth forests. However, less is understood about CWD in intensively managed ecosystems, such as industrialized southern pine plantations. The objectives of this study were to determine the climatic and ecological factors that affect the decomposition rate of CWD, to predict the decomposition rate, specific gravity, and time since death (TSD) using multiple linear regression in industrial loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantations in the southeastern United States. The study sites for this project were part of a long-term, loblolly pine thinning study maintained by the Loblolly Pine Growth and Yield Research Cooperative at Virginia Tech. Measurements included piece size, position, and decay class. Samples of CWD were collected and analyzed to determine their mass and density. Decomposition rate of CWD was significantly different across position classes and decay classes: disk decomposition rates were significantly negatively correlated with disk diameter, large and small end piece diameter, estimated disk height, and disk dry weight. Average annual precipitation and average annual temperature were not significantly correlated with CWD disk decomposition rate.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartJuddPittman.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectPinus taedaen_US
dc.subjectdecay modelen_US
dc.subjectsingle exponential modelen_US
dc.subjectdecompositionen_US
dc.subjectdeadwooden_US
dc.titleCoarse Woody Debris in Industrially Managed Pinus taeda Plantations of the Southeastern United Statesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentForestryen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineForestryen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairCopenheaver, Carolyn A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurkhart, Harold E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRadtke, Philip J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPrisley, Stephen P.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-07292005-165101/en_US
dc.date.sdate2005-07-29en_US
dc.date.rdate2005-08-25
dc.date.adate2005-08-25en_US


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