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dc.contributor.authorConner, David C.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:43:15Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:43:15Z
dc.date.issued2000-07-17en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-08112000-13580038en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/34470
dc.description.abstractThe development of completely autonomous mobile vehicles has been the topic of a great deal of research over the past few decades. Spurred by interests as diverse as space exploration and land mine removal, research has focused on the mechanical requirements, sensing and computational requirements, and intelligence required for autonomous decision making. This thesis focuses on developing the software required for autonomous control, while building upon previous research into appropriate mechanical designs and sensing technologies. The thesis begins by giving an overview of the problem, and then moves on to reviewing the literature relevant to the task of fusing diverse, and often conflicting, sensor data into a usable representation. Literature relevant to the task of using that data to make intelligent decisions in an autonomous manner is reviewed. The focus then shifts to developing a working platform, called Navigator, which tests the theory in the setting of the Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition. The theory required to control Navigator, along with the dynamic analysis used for controls testing, is developed. Image processing techniques useful for extracting features from the course are discussed, and the required mathematical relationships are derived. The thesis then discusses modifications to the Vector Field Histogram technique, which enable Navigator to fuse data from both the image processing and laser rangefinder. Development of the navigation decision-making algorithm is discussed. The information in this thesis is presented in such a way that it can serve as a reference to those who follow in the task of building autonomous vehicles.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartDCCthesis.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the right to archive and to make available my thesis or dissertation in whole or in part in the University Libraries in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all proprietary rights, such as patent rights. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis or dissertation.en_US
dc.subjectmobile robotsen_US
dc.subjectdynamicsen_US
dc.subjectartificial intelligenceen_US
dc.titleSensor Fusion, Navigation, and Control of Autonomous Vehiclesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLeo, Donald J.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-08112000-13580038/en_US
dc.contributor.committeecochairReinholtz, Charles F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeecochairSaunders, William R.en_US
dc.date.sdate2000-08-11en_US
dc.date.rdate2001-08-15
dc.date.adate2000-08-15en_US


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