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dc.contributor.authorKing, Nathan Todden_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:43:16Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:43:16Z
dc.date.issued2005-07-22en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-08112005-135908en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/34476
dc.description.abstractThe initial physiological processes leading to enhanced growth of loblolly pine subsequent to fertilization are not clearly understood. Much of the debate revolves around the temporal response of photosynthesis (Pn) to fertilization or even if Pn increases at all due to enhanced nutrition. This study tracked loblolly pine light-saturated photosynthesis (Asat), dark respiration (Rd), volume, height, basal diameter, and leaf area responses in eight clones to fertilization (112 kg/ha N) over the course of a growing season in the field. Measurements were conducted intensively before and after fertilization in order to track the initial physiological changes prior to any changes in growth in the fertilized seedlings. The results showed that fertilization does increase Pn rates although there was no significant effect on Rd rates during the study. The fertilized seedlings mean Asat rates were significantly higher on three sampling dates and remained higher throughout most of the sampling period. At the end of the growing season, the fertilized seedlings had a 30.5% higher projected crown area than the controls and 48% greater mean volumes. Physiological and growth responses were significantly different among clones with some showing large and others showing little or no response to fertilization. These results support the hypothesis from Gough et al. (2004b) that post-fertilization increases in Pn create extra photoassimilate used in building larger leaf areas. These larger leaf areas contribute to higher canopy photosynthesis levels, which leads to an increase in dry matter production.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartNaKing-thesis2005.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectclonesen_US
dc.subjectfoliar nitrogenen_US
dc.subjectgas exchangeen_US
dc.subjectloblolly pineen_US
dc.titleThe short-term effects of fertilization on loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) photosynthesis, dark respiration, and leaf areaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentForestryen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineForestryen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairSeiler, John R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberParrish, David J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnsen, Kurten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFox, Thomas R.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-08112005-135908/en_US
dc.date.sdate2005-08-11en_US
dc.date.rdate2005-08-17
dc.date.adate2005-08-17en_US


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