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dc.contributor.authorRorrer, Rebecca Kathleenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:43:34Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:43:34Z
dc.date.issued2002-07-16en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-08162002-140834en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/34574
dc.description.abstractBiological and therapeutic agents are used in food animal production to maintain animal health and well being, prevent and treat disease, and to maintain or enhance production. Concerns about the use of pharmaceutical agents in food animal production have been raised, especially in relation to food quality and safety. This study addressed the scarcity of information concerning the quantity of pharmaceuticals being used and the reasons for their use in sheep production. Additional goals included determining the sources of information used by shepherds in making treatment decisions and evaluating the economic impact that pharmaceutical usage has on sheep production. Thirty-nine Virginia sheep producers participated in this study of four months duration from March through September. After completing an initial questionnaire to determine flock and management characteristics, participants were asked to record all treatments with biological and therapeutic agents that occurred within their sheep flocks. A total of 14,310 treatments were recorded for a median of 1.5 treatments per sheep per month. Parasite control and vaccination were the most frequent reasons for treatment (64.9% and 15.2%, respectively) with vitamin/mineral supplementation being the next most common (8.8%). Price information was collected for 13,912 treatment events. An estimated total of $7,523.78 was spent on pharmaceutical treatment over the course of the study. This amounts to a cost of $0.63 per sheep per month of observation. Results of this study will enhance the ability of producers to evaluate treatment decisions, allow comparisons to be made between operations and provide a base of information for future research.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartrkrthesis.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectpharmaceuticalsen_US
dc.subjectbiologicsen_US
dc.subjectsuveyen_US
dc.subjectsheepen_US
dc.titleVeterinary Therapeutic and Biologic Agents in Virginia Sheep Productionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentVeterinary Medical Sciencesen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineVeterinary Medical Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairPelzer, Kevin D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGreiner, Scott P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberElvinger, Francois C.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-08162002-140834/en_US
dc.date.sdate2002-08-16en_US
dc.date.rdate2004-02-05
dc.date.adate2003-02-05en_US


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