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dc.contributor.authorBurke, Nathaniel Caleben_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:43:36Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:43:36Z
dc.date.issued2007-07-26en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-08162007-174653en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/34587
dc.description.abstractMetabolic redox status may have important implications to cattle health and production. Antioxidants and biomarkers of oxidative stress were evaluated in cattle under three phases of management. Each phase stood alone as a treatment model, and managerial aspects during the phase were evaluated as potential moderators of redox balance. Yearling heifers were used to assess the impact of fescue toxicosis and heat stress on selected markers in study 1. Intravaginal temperatures, ADG, serum prolactin, plasma malondialdehyde, and whole blood Se, along with peripheral blood mononuclear cell glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and reduced:oxidized glutathione were determined during summer grazing. Results suggested that endophyte consumption does not promote oxidative stress in cattle. Heat stress may alter glutathione redox of white blood cells. In study 2, effects of gradual weaning strategies (anti-suckle nose clip and fenceline wean) and transport were evaluated in calves. Calf weights, Se and malondialdehyde in plasma, along with glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in leukocytes were measured at -7, 0, 1, and 7 days surrounding weaning and transport. Little benefit of gradual weaning was detected, and oxidative stress may have been negligible. In study 3, the influences of grain- and forage-based diets were compared in finishing steers pre- and post-harvest. Total antioxidant capacity and malondialdehyde concentration of plasma, along with serum alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene, and gamma-tocopherol were measured. Antioxidants and lipid oxidation were assessed in beef. Forages promoting plasma antioxidant capacity may protect cattle against oxidative stress. Antioxidants derived from forages inhibit lipid oxidation in pasture-finished beef.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartThesisNB.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectendophyteen_US
dc.subjectoxidative stressen_US
dc.subjectweaningen_US
dc.subjectantioxidantsen_US
dc.subjectcattleen_US
dc.subjectforage-finished beefen_US
dc.titleAssessment of redox markers in cattleen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentVeterinary Medical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairSwecker, William S. Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBlodgett, Dennis J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSaker, Korinn E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberScaglia, Guillermoen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-08162007-174653/en_US
dc.date.sdate2007-08-16en_US
dc.date.rdate2007-09-13
dc.date.adate2007-09-13en_US


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