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dc.contributor.authorVivekraja, Vigneshen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:44:31Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:44:31Z
dc.date.issued2010-08-27en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-08302010-025430en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/34854
dc.description.abstractTrustworthy authentication of an object is of extreme importance for secure protocols. Traditional methods of storing the identity of an object using non-volatile memory is insecure. Novel chip-identifiers called Silicon Physical Unclonable Functions (PUFs) extract the random process characteristics of an Integrated Circuit to establish the identity. Though such types of IC identifiers are difficult to clone and provide a secure, yet an area and power efficient authentication mechanism, they suffer from instability due to variations in environmental conditions and noise. The decreased stability imposes a penalty on the area of the PUF circuit and the corresponding error correcting hardware, when trying to generate error-free bits using a PUF. In this thesis, we propose techniques to improve the popular delay-based PUF architectures holistically, with a focus on its stability. In the first part, we investigate the effectiveness of circuit-level optimizations of the delay based PUF architectures. We show that PUFs which operate in the subthreshold region, where the transistor supply voltage is maintained below the threshold voltage of CMOS, are inherently more stable than PUFs operating at nominal voltage because of the increased difference in characteristics of transistors at this region. Also, we show that subthreshold PUF enjoys higher energy and area efficiency. In the second part of the thesis, we propose a feedback-based supply voltage control mechanism and a corresponding architecture to improve the stability of delay-based PUFs against variations in temperature.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartVivekraja_Vignesh_T_2010.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectHardware Securityen_US
dc.subjectLow Poweren_US
dc.subjectProcess Variationen_US
dc.subjectPUFen_US
dc.titleLow-Power, Stable and Secure On-Chip Identifiers Designen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentElectrical and Computer Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical and Computer Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairNazhandali, Leylaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchaumont, Patrick Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHa, Dong Samen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-08302010-025430/en_US
dc.date.sdate2010-08-30en_US
dc.date.rdate2010-09-09
dc.date.adate2010-09-09en_US


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