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dc.contributor.authorItskovich, Mikhailen_US
dc.date.accessioned2003-12-16en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:44:41Z
dc.date.available2004-12-16en_US
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:44:41Z
dc.date.issued2003-09-01en_US
dc.date.submitted2003-09-03en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-09032003-094041en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/34901
dc.description.abstractThe growing demand of “System on a Chip” applications necessitates integration of multiple devices on the same chip. Analog to Digital conversion is essential to interfacing digital systems to external devices such as sensors. This presents a difficulty since high precision analog devices do not mix well with high speed digital circuits. The digital environment constraints put demand on the analog portion to be resource efficient and noise tolerant at the same time. Even more demanding, Analog to Digital converters must consume a small amount of power since “System on a Chip” circuits often target portable applications. Analog to digital conversion based on Delta Sigma modulation offers an optimal solution to the above problems. It is based on digital signal processing theory and offers benefits such as small footprint, high precision, noise de-sensitivity, and low power consumption. This thesis presents a methodology for designing low power Delta Sigma modulators using a combination of modern circuit design techniques. The developed techniques have resulted in several modulators that satisfy the initial design parameters. We applied this method to design three different modulators in the 0.35um digital CMOS technology with a 3.3V supply voltage. A first order Self-Referenced modulator has a resolution of 8 bits and the lowest power consumption at 75 uW. The most successful design is the second order Self Referenced modulator that produces 12 bits of resolution with a power consumption of 87 uW. A second order Floating Gate modulator possesses features for high noise rejection, and produces 10 bits of resolution while consuming 276 uW. It is concluded that self-referenced modulators dissipate less power and offer higher performance as compared more complicated circuits such as the floating gate modulator.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartMSThesis.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectmodulatoren_US
dc.subjectlow poweren_US
dc.subjectdelta sigmaen_US
dc.subjectADCen_US
dc.titleDesign of a Low Power Delta Sigma Modulator for Analog to Digital Conversionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentElectrical and Computer Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMSen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairHa, Dong Samen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTront, Joseph G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReed, Jeffrey Hughen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-09032003-094041en_US


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