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dc.contributor.authorBuchanan, Jeffrey Scotten_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:44:44Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:44:44Z
dc.date.issued2000-07-20en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-09042001-174112en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/34914
dc.description.abstractThe simultaneous effects of dietary fiber, temperature, and daylength on the gastrointestinal morphology and physiology in meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) were investigated. Voles were randomly divided (10 in each group) and placed in 15-day treatment regimes [cold (5 C) and warm (21 C), daylengths long (18L:6D) and short (6L:18D), and diets of high fiber (50% neutral detergent fiber [NDF]) and low fiber (5% NDF) content] followed by a 5-day digestibility trial to determine diet digestibility in relation to food intake. Total mass of individuals, length, wet mass and dry mass of the stomach, small intestine, caecum, large intestine, adrenal glands, liver, and kidneys was evaluated. Data was analyzed by ANOVA using the SAS system. Meadow voles increased food intake but decreased turnover time and digestive efficiency under low ambient temperature condition, short daylength, and/or high dietary fiber. Increased energy demand had a minimal effect on the gastrointestinal tissue mass but resulted in slightly increased length of all tissues except the small intestine. The increased food intake and small changes to gastrointestinal morphology during times of increased energy demands suggest that meadow voles are able to meet their energy needs primarily through increased food intake, and therefore more energetically expensive gastrointestinal changes are minimized.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartthesis.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectgastrointestinal morphologyen_US
dc.subjectnutritionen_US
dc.subjectvolesen_US
dc.subjectfiberen_US
dc.titleThe nutritonal ecology of meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) under differing environmental conditionsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBiologyen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiologyen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairCranford, Jack A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcNabb, F. M. Anneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWebb, Kenneth E. Jr.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-09042001-174112/en_US
dc.date.sdate2001-09-04en_US
dc.date.rdate2002-09-21
dc.date.adate2001-09-21en_US


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