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dc.contributor.authorMalueg, Amanda Leahen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:45:38Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:45:38Z
dc.date.issued2007-09-04en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-09172007-214506en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/35091
dc.description.abstractThe measurement of stress hormone levels in wild free-living animals is becoming an increasingly effective method for examining proximate mechanisms of animal behavior and the physiological impacts of human activities on wildlife. In these studies I measured plasma levels of the stress hormone corticosterone in the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis) to determine their role in the reproductive behavior of individuals in this species, and whether they are affected by human disturbance. In chapter one, I provide an introduction to the vertebrate stress response and I describe the natural history of the red-cockaded woodpecker. In chapter two, I compare corticosterone and reproductive hormone levels between breeding males and helper males to examine hormonal mechanisms of reproductive suppression in helper males. No hormonal differences existed between breeding and helper males. However, baseline corticosterone levels were lower in all males living in groups with two or more helper males, suggesting that male helpers reduce the workload of all other group members. In chapter three, I compare corticosterone levels between birds living in clusters subject to two different training restriction regimes on a military installation. Males living in clusters without training restrictions had lower baseline corticosterone than those living in clusters with training restrictions, suggesting that males habituate to chronic disturbance by downregulating baseline corticosterone levels.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartMalueg.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectstressen_US
dc.subjectcorticosteroneen_US
dc.subjectcooperative breedingen_US
dc.subjecthuman disturbanceen_US
dc.subjectPicoides borealisen_US
dc.titleStress in the Red-cockaded Woodpecker: Hormonal Mechanisms of Reproductive Suppression in Helper Males and Impacts of Military Training Activitiesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBiologyen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiologyen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairMoore, Ignacio T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWalters, Jeffrey R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHaas, Carola A.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-09172007-214506/en_US
dc.date.sdate2007-09-17en_US
dc.date.rdate2007-10-16
dc.date.adate2007-10-16en_US


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