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dc.contributor.authorIngram, Mark Edwarden_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:45:39Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:45:39Z
dc.date.issued2006-08-10en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-09182006-152023en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/35100
dc.description.abstractAs the technology of robotics intelligence advances, and new application areas for mobile robots increase, the need for alternative fundamental locomotion mechanisms for robots that allow them to maneuver into complex unstructured terrain becomes critical. In this research we present a novel locomotion mechanism for mobile robots inspired by the motility mechanism of certain single celled organisms such as amoebae. Whole Skin Locomotion (WSL), as we call it, works by way of an elongated toroid which turns itself inside out in a single continuous motion, effectively generating the overall motion of the cytoplasmic streaming ectoplasmic tube in amoebae. This research presents the preliminary analytical study towards the design and development of the novel WSL mechanism. In this thesis we first investigate how amoebas move, then discuss how this motion can be replicated. By applying the biological theories of amoeboid motility mechanisms, different actuation models for WSL are developed including the Fluid Filled Toroid (FFT) and Concentric Solid Tube (CST) models. Then, a quasi-static force analysis is performed for the CST model and parametric studies for design, including power efficiency and force transition characteristics, are presented.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartIngram_WSL_Thesis_ETD.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectRoboticsen_US
dc.subjectAmoebaen_US
dc.subjectWhole Skin Locomotionen_US
dc.subjectBiomimeticen_US
dc.titleWhole Skin Locomotion Inspired by Amoeboid Motility Mechanisms: Mechanics of the Concentric Solid Tube Modelen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairHong, Dennis W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReinholtz, Charles F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSturges, Robert H.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-09182006-152023/en_US
dc.date.sdate2006-09-18en_US
dc.date.rdate2006-11-06
dc.date.adate2006-11-06en_US


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