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dc.contributor.authorDonnelly, David Johnsonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:46:28Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:46:28Z
dc.date.issued2010-09-08en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-10072010-105024en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/35326
dc.description.abstractThis thesis presents the results from the computational fluid dynamics simulations of surface effect ship model tests. The model tests being simulated are of a generic T-Craft model running in calm seas through a range of Froude numbers and in two head seas cases with regular waves. Simulations were created using CD-adapcoâ s STAR-CCM+ and feature incompressible water, compressible air, pitch and heave degrees of freedom, and the volume of fluid interface-capturing scheme. The seals are represented with rigid approximations and the air cushion fans are modeled using constant momentum sources. Drag data, cushion pressure data, and free surface elevation contours are presented for the calm seas cases while drag, pressure, heave, and roll data are presented for the head seas cases. The calm seas cases are modeled both with no viscosity and with viscosity and turbulence. All simulations returned rather accurate estimations of the free surface response, ship motions, and body forces. The largest source of error is believed to be due to the rigid seal approximations. While the wakeâ s amplitude is smaller when viscosity is neglected, both viscous and inviscid simulationsâ estimations of the free surface qualitatively match video footage from the model tests. It was found that shear drag accounts for about a quarter of the total drag in the model test simulations with viscosity, which is a large source of error in inviscid simulations. Adding the shear drag calculated using the ITTC-1957 friction coefficient line to the total drag from the inviscid simulation gives the total drag from the viscous simulations within a 6% difference.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartDonnelly_DJ_T_2010.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectVolume of Fluiden_US
dc.subjectCFDen_US
dc.subjectT-Craften_US
dc.subjectSurface Effect Shipen_US
dc.subjectAir Cushionen_US
dc.subjectFree Surfaceen_US
dc.titleNumerical Simulation of Surface Effect Ship Air Cushion and Free Surface Interactionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentAerospace and Ocean Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAerospace and Ocean Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairNeu, Wayne L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrown, Alan J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCue-Weil, Leigh S.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-10072010-105024/en_US
dc.date.sdate2010-10-07en_US
dc.date.rdate2010-11-10
dc.date.adate2010-11-10en_US


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