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dc.contributor.authorBauman, Cheryl Lynnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:50:25Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:50:25Z
dc.date.issued2006-12-08en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-12192006-171800en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/36302
dc.description.abstractThe wireless technology of today provides combat systems with the potential to communicate mission critical data to every asset involved in the operation. In such a dynamic environment, the network must be able maintain communication by adapting to subsystems moving relative to each other. A theoretical and experimental foundation is developed that allows an autonomous ground vehicle to serve as an adaptive communication node in a larger network. The vehicle may perform other functions, but its primary role is to constantly reposition itself to maintain optimal link quality for network communication. Experimentation with existing wireless network hardware and software led to the development, implementation, and analysis of two main concepts that provided a signal optimization solution. The first attracts the communication ground vehicle to the network subsystems with weaker links using a vector summation of the signal-to-noise ratio and network subsystem position. This concept continuously generates a desired waypoint for repositioning the ground vehicle. The second concept uses a-priori GIS data to evaluate the desired vehicle waypoint determined by the vector sum. The GIS data is used primarily for evaluating the viewshed, or line-of-sight, between two network subsystems using elevation data. However, infrastructure and ground cover data are also considered in navigation planning. Both concepts prove to be powerful tools for effective autonomous repositioning for maximizing the communication link quality.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartThesis_CLB.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectautonomous vehicle teamingen_US
dc.subjectcommunication-sensitive navigationen_US
dc.subjectmobile ad-hoc networken_US
dc.subjectmulti-roboten_US
dc.titleAutonomous Navigation of a Ground Vehicle to Optimize Communication Link Qualityen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairReinholtz, Charles F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHong, Dennis W.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-12192006-171800/en_US
dc.contributor.committeecochairWicks, Alfred L.en_US
dc.date.sdate2006-12-19en_US
dc.date.rdate2007-01-09
dc.date.adate2007-01-09en_US


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