Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHaverstic, Lindell L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:51:02Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:51:02Z
dc.date.issued1997-05-07en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-215919559741551en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/36542
dc.description.abstractIn order to understand a sentence fully, one must understand its parts and the way they work. A complete sentence, in its most simple form, is a substantive with a verb in agreement. Additions to this sentence may include other substantives and verbs, but most additions are modifiers, either adjectival or adverbial. These modifiers should enhance the substantive and its verb, elevating their existence within the sentence. However, modifiers may also detract from the substantive and verb. This occurs when the substantive and verb become lost among the additions. A simple, easily understood complete sentence, i.e. a sentence containing only a substantive with a verb in agreement, becomes with the addition of too many modifiers that are not really necessary a foudryant expression that is difficult, although not impossible to diagram for the purpose of grasping the relationships between words that are, in their present state, convoluded by the addition of modifiers within and without clauses, to decipher. In other words, too many modifiers make a sentence difficult to understand. While the simple complete sentence is concise by its very nature, a concise sentence may contain much more than a substantive with verb. A concise sentence contains the essential and whatever else, if anything, to elevate the essential. Modifiers are not bad per se, but modifiers must remain just that: modifiers. They must be chosen carefully and remain secondary to the essential (provided that their primacy is not the intent). Modifiers and their use within a sentence are distinguishing factors between carefully crafted prose or poetry and misleading verbosity. The beauty of the concise sentence is its ability to express the most while using the least. The same can be true for architecture. For this thesis I looked to the substantive for establishing a connection between a project and the existing architecture of its site. [Vita modified March 5, 2012. GMc]en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartBOOKED7.pdfen_US
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjecthospitalityen_US
dc.subjectchatham hallen_US
dc.subjectboarding schoolen_US
dc.subjectaxisen_US
dc.subjectE. Jeanneen_US
dc.subject.lccLD5655.V855 1997.H384en_US
dc.titleThe Substantiveen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentArchitectureen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitectureen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairRott, Hans Christianen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberO'Brien, Michael J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrown, William W.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-215919559741551/en_US
dc.date.sdate1998-07-13en_US
dc.date.rdate1997-05-07
dc.date.adate1997-05-07en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record