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dc.contributor.authorAkpinar, Brigit Dugganen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:57:47Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:57:47Z
dc.date.issued2004-05-04en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-12102004-114403en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/37150
dc.description.abstractForty years ago President Lyndon B. Johnson put into motion legislation designed to strike a blow at the causes and consequences of poverty. Although newer strategies aimed at poverty reduction have been developed over the intervening years, it is easy to conclude from observing newspaper headlines that poverty continues to be a pressing problem. Microenterprise is one of the more recent poverty alleviation strategies. As a strategy, microenterprise has emerged only recently in the United States, following the example of the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh. Initially, in suit with the model of the Grameen Bank, microenterprise programs focused on the provision of credit. Over time, however, American microenterprise programs have adapted and evolved, shifting their focus away from credit to training and technical assistance. This paper performs first-order and second-order analyses in an attempt to understand how the microenterprise model has evolved in the United States. The first-order analysis will examine the economic, social and political contexts that constrain credit oriented microenterprise strategies. The second-order analysis will examine these contexts with regard to the process of diffusion of innovations. The first-order analysis will reveal the contexts within the United States that have precluded the widespread adoption of the original strategy, while the second-order analysis will reveal how context constrains or facilitates the process of diffusion.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartAkpinarBrigit_majorpaper.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectthe Grameen Banken_US
dc.subjectdiffusion of innovationsen_US
dc.subjectmicroenterpriseen_US
dc.titleThe Evolution of Microenterprise Strategies in the United Statesen_US
dc.typeMajor paperen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPublic and International Affairsen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Public and International Affairsen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Public and International Affairsen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePublic and International Affairsen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairKoebel, Charles Theodoreen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStephenson, Max O. Jr.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-12102004-114403/en_US
dc.date.sdate2004-12-10en_US
dc.date.rdate2005-01-17
dc.date.adate2005-01-17en_US


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