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dc.contributor.authorKnepp, Michael Matthewen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T21:10:07Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T21:10:07Z
dc.date.issued2010-03-23en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-03252010-165217en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/37508
dc.description.abstractAnxiety and its cognitive component of worry have been related to exaggerated cardiovascular reactivity and delayed recovery to laboratory stressors, and to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Previous research on the anxiety-cardiovascular system relationship, including data from Knepp and Friedman (2008), are included to support this project. Two experiments were completed during the course of this study. The first consisted of two peripheral-based body positioning tasks. The second experiment used an active versus passive sympathetic stress task paradigm (mental arithmetic, hand cold pressor). Subjects were nonsmokers free of cardiovascular and neurological disease. Trait worry was examined through the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ). Blood pressure recordings and cardiac recordings through ECG and ICG were done in each experiment during seven epochs: an anticipatory baseline with three baselines preceding and three recovery periods following each task. Repeated measures analysis was run on all cardiovascular measures. In the first experiment, high worriers had worsened blood pressure reactivity to task. The second experiment found that high worriers had increased stroke volume across all epochs. There were mixed findings in the studies relating to subjects acclimated to the laboratory experience. Future directions of research relating anxiety, worry, and cardiovascular risk factors are discussed.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartApprovalLetterKnepp.pdfen_US
dc.relation.haspartKnepp_MM_D_2010.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectAutonomicen_US
dc.subjectBlood Pressureen_US
dc.subjectHeart Rate Variabilityen_US
dc.subjectWorryen_US
dc.titleCardiovascular Reactivity to and Recovery from Laboratory Tasks in Low and High Worry Womenen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairFriedman, Bruce H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHarrison, David W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKim-Spoon, Jungmeenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBell, Martha Annen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-03252010-165217/en_US
dc.date.sdate2010-03-25en_US
dc.date.rdate2010-04-15
dc.date.adate2010-04-15en_US


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