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dc.contributor.authorJanicke, David Michaelen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T21:10:35Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T21:10:35Z
dc.date.issued2001-04-06en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-04262001-215204en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/37659
dc.description.abstractThis study tested portions of a social-cognitive model that explained the mechanisms involved in the parent decision-making process that ultimately drive and maintain children's health care use. Eighty-seven primary caretakers of children ages 4 to 9 years completed measures of child health and behavior, parental stress and functioning, and social cognitive measures related to parenting and health care use. Primary care use data over the two-years prior to recruitment were collected from primary care providers. Regression analysis showed that social cognitive measures were significant predictors of pediatric primary care services. Specifically, parental stress interacted with general parenting self-efficacy; parents with high stress and high parenting self-efficacy were more likely to use pediatric primary care services. Self-efficacy for accessing physician assistance and parental outcome expectations for pediatric physician visits were positively related to pediatric primary care use. These social cognitive variables accounted for more variance than variables traditionally included in health care use research (i.e., child behavior, parental distress, and parent health care use). Best Subsets analysis resulted in an overall best predictive model that accounted for 29.8% of the variance in pediatric primary care use. In this model, the interaction between parental stress and general parenting self-efficacy was the best predictor of use, accounting for 11.5% of the variance in physician use. High internalizing behavior scores, higher self-efficacy for accessing physician assistance, use of medication, and more parent health care visits were associated with higher pediatric primary care use in this overall model. While acknowledging the role of child health and behavior, this study extends the literature by demonstrating the importance of considering parental perceptions of burden, confidence, and ability to help themselves and their family. Implications for health care professionals and directions for future research are discussed in light of these finding.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartjanickedissertation1.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectSelf-Efficacyen_US
dc.subjectUtilizationen_US
dc.subjectChildrenen_US
dc.subjectHealth Careen_US
dc.subjectPrimary Careen_US
dc.titleChildren's Primary Health Care Services: A Social-Cognitive Model of Sustained High Useen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairFinney, Jack W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOllendick, Thomas M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJones, Russell T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberScarpa-Friedman, Angelaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCooper, Robin K. Pannetonen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-04262001-215204/en_US
dc.date.sdate2001-04-26en_US
dc.date.rdate2002-04-27
dc.date.adate2001-04-27en_US


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