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dc.contributor.authorCrumpton, Amy Caraen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T21:18:51Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T21:18:51Z
dc.date.issued1998-11-13en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-091499-212901en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/39336
dc.description.abstractEnvironmental justice activists defined an environmental justice, or community-led, research practice as an alternative conception of science to guide epidemiological investigations of the human health effects of hazardous wastes. Activists inserted their position into an ongoing scientific controversy where multiple epidemiologies existed--environmental, dumpsite, and popular--reflecting various understandings and interests of federal and academic epidemiologists, state public health officials, and anti-toxics activists. A 1991 national symposium on health research needs and the National Environmental Justice Advisory Council, established in 1993 to advise the Environmental Protection Agency, provided important locations through which activists advocated an environmental justice research approach and pressed for its adoption by relevant governmental public health institutions. The shaping of environmental justice research by activists raises intriguing issues about the role of science and expertise in political protest and the importance of democratic participation in the making of environmental policy.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartACCrumpton.diss.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the right to archive and to make available my thesis or dissertation in whole or in part in the University Libraries in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all proprietary rights, such as patent rights. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis or dissertation.en_US
dc.subjectexpertiseen_US
dc.subjecttoxic wasteen_US
dc.subjectsocial movementsen_US
dc.subjectenvironmental justiceen_US
dc.subjectepidemiologyen_US
dc.titleToward a Democratic Science? Environmental Justice Activists, Multiple Epidemiologies, and Toxic Waste Controversiesen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentScience and Technology Studiesen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineScience and Technology Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairDowney, Gary L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLa Berge, Ann F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBarrow, Mark V. Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFuller, Steven W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFuhrman, Ellsworth R.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-091499-212901/en_US
dc.date.sdate1999-09-14en_US
dc.date.rdate2000-11-13
dc.date.adate1999-11-13en_US


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