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dc.contributor.authorJones, Althea Tayloren_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T21:20:35Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T21:20:35Z
dc.date.issued1998-09-18en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-10052007-143801en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/39676
dc.description.abstractThis study was designed to examine the concept of social support from the perspective of 30 African American elders, aged 70 years and above, with an age range of 70 to 99. Guided by the conceptual framework of stress and coping, this research examined the personal beliefs, as well as past experiences that motivate use of social support; when, how, from whom, and under what circumstances support is requested (or offered); and evaluations of the positive and negative outcomes of supportive interactions.

The following research questions guided this study: (a) Whom do African American elders name in their most important network of supportive others and what meanings do they attach to the support? (b) What beliefs motivate and define African American elders' involvement in a social support network? and (c) How do African American elders evaluate the consequences of their supportive interactions?

Qualitative in-depth interviewing was the method of data collection. Findings from this study showed that the African American elder informants were embedded in supportive networks, deeply devoted to family, friends and other committed partnerships, had strong religious and family ties, and had resiliency relative to the life stage of older adulthood. The foundation of their supportive interactions was based on their belief systems as well as their desire to reciprocate support. These informants were atypical by education and occupation. Varied coping resources emerged from the study including interdependence, spiritual beliefs, family philosophy, concern for others and self-protection.

en_US
dc.format.mediumBTDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartLD5655.V856_1998.J664.pdfen_US
dc.subjectmeaningsen_US
dc.subjectbeliefsen_US
dc.subjectwell-beingen_US
dc.subjectAfrican American eldersen_US
dc.subjectsocial supporten_US
dc.subject.lccLD5655.V856 1998.J664en_US
dc.titleMeanings, beliefs, and well-being :a qualitative study of social support among African American eldersen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentFamily and Child Developmenten_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and Child Developmenten_US
dc.contributor.committeechairBird, Gloria W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBenson, Mark J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJackson, Jacquelyne J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPollard, Alton B. IIIen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSporakowski, Michael J.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-10052007-143801/en_US
dc.date.sdate2007-10-05en_US
dc.date.rdate2007-10-05
dc.date.adate2007-10-05en_US


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