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dc.contributor.authorHarps-Logan, Yvetteen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T21:21:20Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T21:21:20Z
dc.date.issued1990-10-15en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-10142005-135750en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/39907
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine if there were differences in clothing values between Black and White middle-income women patronizing the primary and second-order markets, and to determine if there were differences in the clothing buying practices between these groups in the two markets. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to a purposive sample of 250 Black and White women residing in three metropolitan areas. The clothing values measured were economic, po1itical, religious, and conformity. Eighteen clothing buying practices were included in this study. N1ne practices were speclfical1y directed toward the second-order market shoppers. Variations were found in the rank order of clothing values within the two groups. Blacks ranked the religious value higher and conform1ty lower than the Whites.

Blacks scored higher on the economic and re1igous clothing values while Whites scored higher on conformity.

Significant differences between Black and White middle-income women in their clothing buying practices were found in: (1) the method used to acquire the majority of clothing; (2) the percentage of personal clothing items purchased in primary stores; and (3) buying pattern for a dress costing more than $50.00.

Significant differences between Black and White middle-income women who used the second-order market were found in: (1) length of time respondents had purchased used-clothing; (2) satisfaction with price when making used-clothing purchases; (3) shopping the Salvation Army, Goodwi11, and thrift stores; purchasing of (4) pants; and buying used-clothing to wear for (5) work and (6) school.

Middle-income women who used the primary market exclusively scored higher on the conformity clothing value than did those who used the second-order market.

Black consumers who used the second-order market held higher religious clothing values and lower conformity values than did the White women.

en_US
dc.format.mediumBTDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartLD5655.V856_1990.H376.pdfen_US
dc.subjectAfrican Americans Clothingen_US
dc.subjectClothing and dress Researchen_US
dc.subject.lccLD5655.V856 1990.H376en_US
dc.titleClothing values and clothing buying practices of black and white middle income womenen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentClothing and Textilesen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineClothing and Textilesen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairDensmore, Barbara E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPurdy, Rita S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRitchey, Sanford J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGurel, Lois M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEubanks, Gina E.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-10142005-135750/en_US
dc.date.sdate2005-10-14en_US
dc.date.rdate2005-10-14
dc.date.adate2005-10-14en_US


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