Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLi, Rensshengen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T21:21:23Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T21:21:23Z
dc.date.issued1991-06-05en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-10142005-135808en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/39924
dc.description.abstract

Deficiency of available nitrogen (N) is one of the major factors limiting the establishment of a long term self-sustaining vegetative community on mine soils. This investigation was conducted to study the nature of N form and dynamics in southwest Virginia mine soils.

Fresh mine spoils contained a large amount of indigenous N, ranging from 650 to 2500 mg/kg soil, which complicated N studies. Most of the indigenous N was "geologic N" which was unavailable to plants. The geologic N came from either 2:1 silicate minerals (fixed NH4+) or coal fragments (nonhydrolyzable organic N). Active N, consisting of hydrolyzable organic N and exchangeable N, comprised the minor fraction of indigenous N available to plants.

en_US
dc.format.mediumBTDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartLD5655.V856_1991.L5.pdfen_US
dc.subjectSoils Virginia Southwesternen_US
dc.subjectMines and mineral resources Virginia Southwesternen_US
dc.subject.lccLD5655.V856 1991.L5en_US
dc.titleNitrogen cycling in young mine soils in Southwest Virginiaen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentCrop and Soil Environmental Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-10142005-135808/en_US
dc.date.sdate2005-10-14en_US
dc.date.rdate2005-10-14
dc.date.adate2005-10-14en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record